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Bowhunting From A Ground Blind

Heath Wood

 

 

Hunting from a ground blind doesn’t give a hunter a free pass when it comes to movement. Taking the proper steps to stay quiet while hunting and more importantly while trying to make the shot on an animal is still extremely important.
 
When the temperatures get down close to freezing during the first part of fall, there is an unexplainable feeling of excitement that hunters get. This is because they know the wildlife will be moving and the hunting is good. One thing that hunters forget during this time is that when it is cold, the outdoors become quiet and everything makes a sound. Those pops and crackles that occur during this time lay fault to many hunts getting messed up, resulting in the hunter not getting a shot off. This can be prevented if one will take a few steps into consideration before bowhunting out of a ground blind.

The correct clothing must be worn by the hunter. With fall temperatures usually being on the cool side, it is not uncommon for the hunter to have a lot of garments on or garments that are thicker than normal. These types of clothing can cause the act of pulling back a bow to become a challenge. The hunter needs to make sure that there are no loose-fitting fabrics hanging that could hang up in the string or cams of a bow. There are several types of arm guards and socks designed to go over the hunter’s arm; this will help keep all fabrics out of the way when shooting. As a hunter, paying attention to what camouflage is being worn while in a ground blind is a must. Mossy Oak’s Cuz Strickland prefers wearing the Mossy Oak Eclipse pattern, /camouflage/break-up-eclipse which is a pattern designed specially to be worn while in a ground blind. This pattern consists of Mossy Oak Break-Up Country pattern topped with a layer of black with patches of the Break-Up Country exposed.
 
Once the hunter’s clothing is taken care of, making sure that it cannot get in the way of a shot or ruin the shot by being seen from outside of the blind, the next detail needs to be in how one is positioned in the blind. Most hunters will carry some type of chair with a back that is comfortable enough for longs sits. Comfort is key, yet it is also important to have the chair in the right spot. When bowhunting, the chair needs to be towards the back of the blind so that there is plenty of room to draw the bow without hitting the front part of the window or the blind walls. Once the hunter gets into the blind at the beginning of the hunt, it is recommended to make sure all gear is out of the way of arms and legs. This is so that when an animal presents a shot opportunity the hunter can draw his or her bow quietly without any obstacles getting in the way. After making sure that everything is clear, draw the bow once or twice to make sure nothing is in the way before the hunt begins. Remember, when bowhunting in a ground blind, keep a stealthy mind at all times.

Best Ground Blinds for Bowhunting

 

 

In today’s world of hunting the ground blind possibilities are endless. With the hunting industry bigger and better than it has ever been, it is no surprise that manufactures have designed and developed every shape and size of ground blind imaginable. This leaves many beginning and novice hunters asking themselves what is the best ground blind.

Although the answer should be whatever fits you as a hunter the best, there are still a few important features that should be taken into consideration when choosing the right ground blind for bowhunting. A bowhunter’s ground blind should be BIG! When bowhunting, no matter if it is hunting deer, elk, antelope or turkeys, a ground blind should have a lot of space. This is due to the fact that it takes a lot of room to be able to have all of the gear needed for a successful hunt, and most importantly, a big space allows for plenty of room in order to be able to draw a bow without having any obstructions from inside the blind in the way. Remember, a hunter needs room not only for themselves but also room for a chair, backpack and sometimes a cameraman or another hunter that is just along for the show.
 
Hunters should look for a blind that has a strong, tight feel to the fabric. The blind should also have plenty of loops and straps on all sides for anchoring it into place as well as when brushing in a blind to help blend into the surroundings. Fabrics should also be made of fade resistant materials. A faded blind is a sign that the materials are breaking down. Hunters should pay attention to the size of the windows in a blind, making sure that they are big enough to be able to shoot a bow out of and also making sure that they zip down. These are both important features when making sure that there is room to draw a bow, then get into position to make the shot without bumping into obstacles.
 
Other important features to look for are blinds that are easy to assemble and disassemble, but are still a durable to hold up to weather conditions if left out for an extended period of time. A blind that is easy to transport is another factor to consider when choosing a blind. A hunter can find ground blinds that have every feature that a bowhunter could ever want, however, if one cannot easily get back and forth from hunting with it, those features will not do them any good. As one can imagine, the price of a ground blind can vary. Prices vary according to how many features are available on that specific ground blind. A well-designed ground blind can still be more affordable than a treestand or permanent box blind and realistically, convenience is worth its weight in gold.

When purchasing a ground blind for bowhunting, it is recommended to go to a sporting goods retailer that has demo blinds available. Get in them and check them out for yourself. If this is not an option, the next best thing is to get on the internet and look up reviews as well as how-to videos from customers themselves.

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